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FeibusTech: market insight & analysis. Influencer, analyst in IoT, digital health/fitness, wearables, connected car, smart home, privacy/security. Columnist for Tech section of USA TODAY and Fortune.

FeibusTech is brought to you by TechKnowledge Strategies, which has been providing clear, critical and independent insight to technology buyers and suppliers for more than a decade.  TechKnowledge offers a mix of business acumen with a discerning grasp of technology and a savvy honed by years of hands-on experience. If you have questions, TechKnowledge has answers.

FeibusTech Blog

Galaxy Tab S4: Now, Windows on an Android Tablet

Mike Feibus

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Just to clarify, I mean to say that you can now have multiple windows open for all your Android apps – that's windows with a lower-case “w.” We’re not talking Microsoft Windows. The Tab S4, announced today, features DeX, Samsung’s multitasking productivity platform for Android. That’s not unusual for a flagship device from the electronics giant. What is new, however, is that DeX will run right on the tablet, even without an external display attached.

That means you can edit a Word document in one window while watching a livestream in another. That’s actually what I’ll be doing from the beach next week, when Samsung holds its annual Unpacked reveal in New York City! And one nice DeX enhancement with this version: you can now resize any window, not just DeX-aware apps.

There’s no dock for the S4. An external display connects via the USB-C port. Of course, if you’re interested in the Tab S4 as a productivity device, then you’ll want the optional keyboard. It’s $149.99, though it’s 50 percent off if you buy it with your Tab S4 by midnight … on September 8th. (The Tab S4 itself starts at $649.99 for the 64GB version.)

The specs were well-leaked in recent weeks, for the most part. Just to call out a couple highlights: a larger, 10.5-inch display packed into the same form factor as the Tab S3, Snapdragon 835 processor, 4GB of system memory, 64GB or 256GB of storage, 13MP and 8MP cameras and a beefy 7,300mAh battery for all-day operation – and fast charging to boot. LTE is optional. Qualcomm’s 2x2 802.11ac is standard, which means a stronger Wi-Fi signal for faster connections and better range. The device also has Bluetooth 5.0, which is faster and lower power than previous versions. Here is Samsung's Tab S4 press release.

Speaking of Bluetooth, the Tab S4 has one other nice touch: it supports Bluetooth mice, which means you can really be in full-on desktop mode with the POGO-attached keyboard, a Bluetooth mouse and a large display, bouncing between all the open applications just like you would on a Windows desktop.

This time, I do mean Windows with a capital “W.”

I’ll have one of these bad boys in hand soon, so stay tuned for a more detailed run-through. And also the Note9, which, you know, we’ll talk more about next week!

Downsizing the Big Data Problem

Mike Feibus

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Machine learning, the most common foundation for building artificial intelligence algorithms, absolutely requires big data to identify patterns. That turns out to be one of the biggest hurdles for AI today.

Researchers often don't have enough data to give them a sample size large enough to draw conclusions. Combining multiple data stores to build a sufficiently large set can be a very expensive, time-consuming and labor-intensive process.

Montefiore Health Systems in New York seems to have overcome this tyranny of big data in the healthcare space. Their sophisticated PALM platform is able to blend multiple data stores and churn out life-saving AI algorithms with a speed and ease that few believed possible.

In cooperation with Intel, Montefiore embedded Mike Feibus, FeibusTech's Principal Analyst, into the healthcare system to learn more about this game-changing new platform, and how Intel Xeon Scalable processors are helping to drive the PALM team's success. Don't miss Embedded Analyst: AI Without Borders, FeibusTech's compelling new Research Brief.

Afraid of Needles? Help is On the Way

Mike Feibus

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As many as one in four of us HATE needles. Some will even go so far as to forego the care we need just to steer clear of syringes.

Finally, needle-free innovations are beginning to poke their way through. Find out more. Check out my latest on what's here, and what's coming soon, in the Tech section of USA TODAY. If you're only interested in hearing about it, then head on over to iHeart Radio, where I talk about my column on The Daily Dive. Feel free to skip over the important issues of the day and head straight to my segment. It begins at the 13-minute mark.

The Beginning of the End of Passwords

Mike Feibus

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When it comes to enterprise security, people are the weakest link. They give away their passwords by clicking on phishing emails. And by storing them on Post-It Notes and spreadsheets. And by making them easy to guess with passwords like 'Password' and 'Password123.'

Now, finally, technology is at the point where IT managers can actually dispense with passwords. So the network is secure. And employees get access quickly and painlessly.

Everbody wins! Find out how. Read my latest CIO Magazine column HERE.

This Is Facebook's Tylenol Moment

Mike Feibus

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Facebook's latest crisis of trust has landed the mega-social network at a crucial crossroads, and its relevancy just may be hanging in the balance. To survive, CEO Mark Zuckerberg needs to snag a page from James Burke's playbook. Burke, the late CEO of Johnson & Johnson, successfully navigated his company through the Tylenol scare 35 years ago.

Find out how - and see what lessons there are for Facebook. Read my latest CIO Magazine column HERE.

Open Wi-Fi: A Cure for TS?

Mike Feibus

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Have you ever faced a purchasing decision so weighty and daunting that you delayed or avoided it altogether?

I have a name for the phenomenon. I call it “Threshold Syndrome,” or TS. People with TS know that what they want is waiting for them on the other side of the proverbial door. But the gravity of the decision keeps them from passing through. They worry that the cost of making a bad choice could be life-altering. So they linger in the doorway.

IT buyers know TS all too well. They typically come down with it when they take on new network deployments. Because they know that once they pull the trigger, they’ll be locked into a vendors’ system. Which means that they go as the vendor goes. If the vendor raises prices for new hardware or tacks on maintenance fees for new services, then they pay more. And if the vendor is late with new hardware, then the state-of-the-network lags.

Fortunately for network decision-makers, an antidote for TS is gaining momentum in the marketplace: open Wi-Fi. By giving IT the power to mix and match compatible hardware, software and services from different vendors, open Wi-Fi effectively breaks down big deployment decisions into smaller, more palatable choices. If the access points turn out to be disappointing, for example, IT can turn to a different supplier for upgrade and expansion.

Naturally, prices will come down and quality will rise once vendors are forced to compete at every turn. It’s one reason FeibusTech is forecasting growth in enterprise Wi-Fi deployments to accelerate.

Open Wi-Fi is gaining steam in the marketplace. At the Open Compute Project’s annual US Summit this week, in fact, the 3,000 or so attendees and exhibitors will be treated to Wi-Fi connectivity by way of the first-ever all-open, large-scale deployment, courtesy Mojo Networks and Edgecore Networks. It’s a significant, if symbolic, milestone in the legitimacy of open Wi-Fi.

And, in the process, we’re one step closer to stamping out TS in the enterprise.

OCP: One Small Step for Open Wi-Fi ...

Mike Feibus

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Facebook founded the Open Compute Project seven years ago with a vision of building powerful, cost-efficient datacenters and networks. So imagine how demotivating it would have been for attendees and exhibiters at the OCP’s US Summit next week in San Jose to be forced to connect to the internet over pricey, proprietary Wi-Fi networks.

Two OCP members decided that was unacceptable, and decided to do something about it. So together, Mojo Networks and Edgecore Networks built the first large large-scale open Wi-Fi network for the 3,000 Summit attendees and exhibitors, spanning 75,000 square feet of the San Jose Convention Center. Mojo’s cloud-managed suite, Cognitive WiFi, is serving as the network’s operating system for Edgecore’s access points.

Now that’s motivation!

FTInsights: 2018 - Takeoff Time For Remote Patient Monitoring?

Mike Feibus

Follow along as I interview Eric Rock, founder and CEO of Vivify Health, one of the largest remote care platforms on the market today. We're talking about cost management, establishing a hierarchy of care, transitional care and patient self-management. More and more, the remote patient monitoring and interpretation of data is blurring the lines between wellness, prevention, to diagnosis and treatment. It's also disrupting the traditional onboarding of patients to providers in an in-office environment, and that's not a bad thing.

Highlights From CES Digital Health Summit and Last Gadget Standing

Mike Feibus

Conversation with David Rhew, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung, and Rob Flippo, CEO at MobileHelp, talking about the user experience and simplifying healthcare tech for emergency response applications. Watch the video to learn more about the advances in the data collection and what that means for the consumer, and where the wearable technology is going towards prevention and connection to emergency services.

Rebecca Madsen, Chief Consumer Officer at United Healthcare, and Naimish Patel, Vice President Client Solutions at Rally Health, Inc. discuss how healthcare companies are partnering with health tech solutions to bridge the gap to consumers. From finding a primary care to contracted rates and understand co-pays, applications and real time integration between the payer and provider is the future of consumer healthcare.

With privacy being a forefront concern among smartphone and connected tech users, Joshua Konowe, Chief Marketing and Strategy Officer at Silent Circle, introduces us to their new product, GoSilent. David Pogue, Founder of Yahoo Tech, brings up objections for the mobile firewall that claims to protect your data by connecting to any existing network.

Buyers' Guide: Gateways for Remote Patient Monitoring

Mike Feibus

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Remote patient monitoring is taking off, driven in part by a desire to improve care and in part by necessity to help ease the nation's growing healthcare burden Many healthcare systems, as a consequence, are adding remote patient monitoring programs to their offerings.

Decision-makers at healthcare systems not only need to choose which connected devices to include in kits. More importantly, they need to select a platform to engage patients, collect the data and transmit it securely back to the EHR.

FeibusTech has produced a research brief, commissioned by Intel, to help those guide decision-makers through the process. The brief, Remote Patient Monitoring Gateways: Key Considerations for Choosing the Best Option for your Remote Patient Monitoring Programs, is now available for download.

Post CES 'Most Mentioned' and More

Mike Feibus

Following CES 2018, I have plenty to explore in healthtech, especially the design, metrics, and integrations on the verge with wearables, hearables, and other health tech trends. I’ll be touching on insights with Samsung and MobileHealth emergency response system.

Pay attention to directional changes in the health sector in regards to diabetes & hearing aids.

Non-intrusive data collection is huge, but more importantly, what consumers can gain from the metrics without the data overload.

 

Notice the twitter ‘most mentioned’ - if you’re on twitter, follow me here for updates.

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Plus an honorable mention in DigiObs TOP 15 INFLUENCERS:

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FT INSIGHTS: 2018 CES Preview

Mike Feibus

With CES fast approaching, I’m breaking down my predictions for the hot trends and themes for 2018. It’s an exciting time for healthtech, from sleeptech to hearables. Voice assist, such as Google Voice, Microsoft’s Cortana, and Amazon’s Alexa will be expanding throughout your home this year. Mixed reality, augmented reality and virtual reality, have grown up with new developments for business application. Find out when you can catch me at the Digital Health Summit at CES, and watch more on my Youtube Channel here.

Heart-Healthy Wearables? Believe It

Mike Feibus

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A new wave of wearables and companion apps is emerging with the ability to monitor vital signs crucial to spotting heart problems, giving us and our doctors powerful new weapons to fight stroke and heart disease.

It should make for a very exciting 2018. I can't wait!

Want to know more? Read my latest column in the Tech section of USA TODAY here.

The Incredible Disappearing Ethernet Cable

Mike Feibus

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Evidence that the digital transformation in the workplace is under way abounds. In conference rooms, break rooms and other common areas in buildings and around campus, employees are working and collaborating wirelessly using their personal devices and other office equipment.

Connections of new wireless equipment already outnumber wired devices by a 6:1 ratio, and that number is forecasted to grow to more than 30:1 by 2022, FeibusTech forecasts.

There is another more subtle artifact of the transformation. Although Ethernet jacks are still commonplace in offices, conference rooms and other work areas, the cables used to connect devices to the network via those jacks are disappearing.

If you are an IT decision-maker planning your organization's digital transformation, the growing paucity of Ethernet cables is telling you something. Read the new FeibusTech research brief, and find out what it means for your deployment plans.

 

Intel, Flex Inject Choice into Home Health Market

Mike Feibus

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Intel and Flex revealed today that they have partnered on a remote patient monitoring platform that gives care providers a new level of flexibility and choice.

Flex is now offering the Flex IoT Compute Engine, built around Intel’s Health Application Platform, a compact gateway that remote care providers can use to anchor monitoring kits that are reliable, secure and simple to use.

Remote patient monitoring is one of the fastest-growing segments in healthcare because it has such great potential to slash hospital readmissions and, consequently, lower costs for our overburdened healthcare system. Constant monitoring helps ensure patients are complying with recovery plans, and also helps spot signs of trouble early, so providers can react before things spiral.

Intel and Flextronics believe the openness of the platform will draw remote care providers, because they want to be able to choose which cloud services to use. And they also want to maintain control of their patients’ data from end to end.

I’ll be in Boston next week for the Connected Health Conference, meeting with – among others – remote care providers. I’ll see what they have to say about the potential for this market, and also get a sense for what they’re looking for in home-health gateways that anchor their platforms.

I’ll report back soon. So watch this space!

(produced in cooperation with Intel)